Monday, 13 August 2018

5 Points To Consider When Selling Your Skills

5 Points To Consider When Selling Your Skills
I don't know about you but the idea of having to sell myself terrifies me. Picture this, you're applying for a job that you know you're more than perfect for. Your skills match the description and your experience is second to none. Your personality fits the bill and though your potential boss has already read your CV, they want more - You need to sell yourself. Similarly in the blogging world, whether you want to pitch to a brand or another creator for a collaboration, your work can speak volumes but you need to go that extra mile - Again, you need to sell yourself. 

In theory it sounds easy but truthfully, it takes more than just a list of things you're good at. Couple that with the fact that us humans are hardwired to disagree with anything positive about us and we ourselves in a bit of a pickle. Having had to attempt to sell myself for various reasons over the past few months, I wanted to share the hints and tips I've taken into account. 

Be confident in your work You know yourself better than anyone so when talking about yourself, be confident in what you're saying. You want to tell whoever it may concern, why you're the best person for the job whether it's a promotion at work or a collaboration campaign. Using a phrase like 'I know I am..' is far more powerful than 'I think I am..'. As I mentioned, you know yourself and your work better than anyone else so only you can make judgement on your full potential.

Use a mix of examples Whether you're putting pen to paper, key to email or even face to face, you want to be armed with a range of examples. Previous work is key to showing what you've already accomplished but also noting your goals if you were to take on the project, shows initiative and forward thinking. Also, don't forget to utilise your skill set and show how they relate to what it is you'll be doing. 

Stay on point In my opinion, it's better to be short and impactful rather than detailing a 342 page novel. In the same way that your CV 'should' be on one page, when pitching to a brand or a potential employer, you want to keep them engaged while getting across everything you want to say. When discussing a new project at work I made a long list of everything I wanted to include, starred the most important and then worked everything into about 4 paragraphs with a summary at the end. I made sure there was no scroll bar on the email so that the recipient could have every word right in front of her without the need to start taking notes because it ran on too long.

Remind yourself why you're doing it If you're struggling to come up with reasons why you're the right fit, sit back and ask yourself if it's something you should be doing. Even if the flow doesn't come to you at first, if it's still not there when you come back to it a few days later, evaluate if it really is the best move for you. Going back to being confident, you want to be in it for the right reason  and that reason is, because you're the best person for the job. 

Don't be afraid of knock-backs What I try to keep in mind throughout processes like this is what's the worst that could happen? Sure, you apply for a promotion but someone beat you to it, it's probably  because they were a better fit the job. Similarly, when pitching to brands, if it doesn't work out, I know that at that moment I'm not right for it but next time I might be. It's difficult being rejected when you know you meet the criteria but more often than not, it's nothing personal, someone else was better suited and sometimes, that's a blessing in disguise. 

How do you deal with selling yourself or your skills whether it's for a job or within the blogging industry? Tips are always welcome!

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